R2AK_FullCourse_Map

Racing an amphibious Kinetic Sculpture … 750 miles to Alaska?

“Inconvenience is only Adventure Improperly Construed; Adventure is Inconvenience properly construed”. -G.K. Chesterton

I used to think The Grand Championship Kinetic Sculpture Race (GCKSR) in Northern California was the most ambitious and inspiring event I’d heard of,   especially irresistible to this particular kind of temperament:   type-2 fun loving,   artist-tinkerer-engineer-adventurer.     There, people race over a 50 mile course in human powered vehicles they’ve built themselves,    where the course includes a mile in the Pacific Ocean,    ascending and descending steep sand dunes,   crossing the Eel River,     and – if that weren’t enough –   judging each other on how inspiring and excellent is the ART that they, and their vehicles, comprise.  There’s something irresistible about such an insane specification, with so many conflicting challenges needing to be overcome to build, and propel,  a vehicle over such a course.   Inventors and adventurers (and generally the sorts who delight in problem solving)   thrive on such implausible and difficult tasks.   A tough-mudder for the mind, and body, and workshop, all.      Thinking of Chesterton’s Quote on the kinship of inconvenience and adventure,  both races appeal to my desire for adventure,  aka   “Creatively Inconveniencing Myself”.

“For the Glory” is the tagline of this race –   a cheer and sentiment which inspires years-long passion projects by avid tinkerers. And this might well be the rallying cry also of those who do the Race To Alaska.    The 750 mile ocean “Race To Alaska” (R2AK) starts one week after the Kinetic Sculpture Race,   and goes by Inland Passage along the Pacific Coast – by water – 750 miles to Ketchikan AK.    The only rules are that no motors are allowed,  and two waypoints set the rough outline of the course.   First prize is a hefty $10K.   Second prize is a set of steak knives.   I don’t think there’s a third prize, and yet people do this daunting and bold trek in Paddle-boards and Kayaks,   even when the chances of ‘winning’ in such vessels,   where carbon fiber sailing rocket catamarans are competing on equal terms,  are vanishingly small.   These racers are doing it for the experience,  for the satisfaction,  and every bit for the same Glory spoken of by Kinetic Sculpture Racers.   And so,  having found inspiration from both sources now,   I am newly  refocused in my ambition to build an efficient amphibious craft.  The Race I’m building for only begins in Arcata;   it will end in Ketchikan.  To do it, I’ll need to build an amphibious,  human and wind powered, vehicle that can move as efficiently as possible over each of the following terrains:

All Terrain means:

  1.  the Northern Pacific in high winds up to gale force.
  2.  glass-smooth protected waterways with zero wind
  3.  paved roads
  4.  steep sand dunes and slippery cement boat ramps
  5.  rocky river shores

There have been several times in the past,  where I’ve undertaken things which seemed similarly bold.     Month-or-two long self supported bicycle tours and hiking trips across deserts in summer and snow-capped high mountain passes, mainly.     Consistently,  each of these ventures has quickly become obvious as seminal,   epoch-defining rites of passage;  intensely rewarding in the moment and over much longer views, both.   Intensely rewarding in physical and mental health and vigor.       Each time such trips have begun,  the flood of recognition, of joy, has inspired me to ask:  how did I let it get so long!   Don’t wait so long to do this again!   And it has been a while since my last adventure. This has been a period of incredible growth, and I find myself better poised than ever before to undertake something grand.    My engineering skills have never been greater,  and I’ve recently,   finally,   acquired my own CNC milling machine (a beautiful early 1990’s Bridgeport),  and can make sophisticated and strong parts out of metal in the comfort of my own home, at last.  I have a community of mentors to talk to,  and a recent success at work has granted me more independence and autonomy than previously,  with which to take a month or two for a grand epic adventure.   To the toolkits of a mechanical and electrical engineer I’ve recently added also initial forays into carbon fiber and fiberglass composite construction,   and I’m excited for bringing to bear the full force of my creativity and craft to build a vehicle meeting my needs for these races.

And so I begin here a thread of documentation,  detailing the engineering thinking and progress towards realizing a vehicle capable of both the Kinetic Sculpture Race, and the Race to Alaska,    in May and June of this year,  2019.

Vehicle Specification:

1. Design and build a seaworthy boat which will be transported to the race site in 135 days, May 25th 2019.   This boat will be able to carry me and necessary supplies to live for at least 1 week between resupply points in the coastal wilderness of British Columbia and Alaska

2. The boat will be able to be powered and move as efficiently as possible on both land and water.   Power sources will include sail,   oar,  and pedals.    Motors powered by solar panels are out.   Fuel-burning non-biological engines are out.

3. The boat will Be, and carry, Art.   My best idea of this at present is musical: the boat is a thin shell not unlike a cello body.  It will be sonourous if excited into vibration by strings.     I am an excellent improvisational cellist.  I have performed on sailboats before and been delighted to see the bobbing heads of seals come to visit and listen,   and I would have more of such experiences.    Ideally I will instrument the boat with hydrophones and frequency shifting electronics so that I can maintain a constant awareness of the soundscape of the waters I travel over,    whose inhabitants include whales,  seals, otters, dolphins,  and much more.     At intervals,  I will intersperse the sustained exertion with musical explorations of my mood, and my settings,  and any collaborators I can find to riff with – hopefully including a few marine as well as other terrestrial bipedal mammals.

4. The boat will be able to be propelled up a slime-covered common boat-launch ramp slope of 6% grade under human power without exiting the craft. Reconfiguration, if necessary, must be accomplished in the water.

4.  The boat will be able to be propelled along a level paved road at an average speed of at least 7mph,  and ideally 12mph,  under human power alone. (Sets rolling efficiency and wind resistance maximums.)

5. The boat should weigh less than 300 pounds,  and ideally closer to 200 pounds,   unladen.

6.  The boat should be tough and not brittle, and redundantly buoyant.   The boat should be tested for collision endurance against blunt rocks and submerged logs, and all practical measures taken to increase it’s survivability in such an encounter.

7. The boat will ideally have autopilot when under sail.  (I am a robotics engineer after all).   Autopilot should be able to tack to maintain course in high aspect ratio coastal inlet passages.  Autopilot should self-diagnose all anticipatable failure modes and in particular detect implausible sudden shifts of position that may indicate invalid data due to mountainous interference.

8.   A GPS-enabled physical pointing device will be built as a smart compass.  It can point directly at things.    GPS pointer will be able to  pivot around 3 perpendicular axes of rotation, so that if distances are sufficienty remote,   the pointer will be seen to be pointing below the horizon due to the curvature of the earth.

…   more to come …

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