Controlling Lightning Morphology around and within the Same Flower during Kirlian or High voltage Photography

Artocarpus Altilis - the breadfruit tree's leaf.  test shot - with a DSLR - taken just prior to the large format analog film exposure. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breadfruit
Artocarpus Altilis – the breadfruit tree’s leaf. test shot – with a DSLR – taken just prior to the large format analog film exposure. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breadfruit

 

I’ve been home for but a week, and tomorrow I set out on a grand adventure of driving crosscountry in wintertime for a yet grander adventure  as an artist in residence at the incomparable Autodesk Pier-9 workshop.   Before I go though, I wanted to upload a few of the digital test shots I made while in hawaii this last month, shooting “Electrified Flowers (and leaves) of Hawaii“.

These were off the cuff test shots – throw-aways – done to check my exposure, check the electrical apparatus,  and visualize the pattern of branching lightning that I might be about to record onto expensive 20-square-inch large sheets of silver halide and color film.   These are not the final products of my project, rather mere teasers of work-in-progress.   (I have yet to develop that film, which I’ll do once I can settle into San Francisco.)   However,  I’m pretty ecstatic with the results, sofar!

One of the most exciting learning discoveries for me during this work is that I can significantly control whether lightning issues radially from the leaf,  or tangentially skirting around it,   or some mix between the two.    I’m looking forward to making an excellent explanation of how this works,  both practically and in detailed physical terms.  It will probably be a chapter of the book I’m working on, “Theory and Practice of High Voltage Photography”.

Congea Griffithiana,  Pink Sandpaper Vine,  a.k.a. Shower Orchid.  introduced relatively recently to Hawaii.  From the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden.
Congea Griffithiana, Pink Sandpaper Vine, a.k.a. Shower Orchid. introduced relatively recently to Hawaii. From the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden.
Pink Sandpaper Vine
Identical leaf as above, taken within about 10 minutes of each other, with a minor but significant change to the charging circuit. Note how different is the form of the lightning!!

 

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“Electrified Flowers of Hawaii” Kickstarter succeeds at 227%

The “Electrified Flowers of Hawaii” project succeeded in raising more than twice it’s initial funding goal!  Consequently I am now in Hawaii where, for the next month, I will be studying the floral biodiversity of the Big Island using a large format film camera and apparatus I built myself, including a lightning machine (a Marx generator) capable of producing intense pulses of electricity at up to a quarter million volts.

Gordon Kirkwood selected as Artist in Residence at Autodesk’s Pier-9 Dream-lab.

“Giddy” cannot begin to describe my feelings upon learning,  on Thanksgiving,  that I have been selected to be an Artist In Residence at Autodesk’s Pier-9 dream-lab  in San-Francisco.

The concentration of brains,  initiative, creativity, and capability in that space is stunning. In close approximation to Tony Stark’s workshop (from the movie Iron-Man) — a dream-shop with some of the most capable robotic fabrication equipment and tooling in existence including 3D printers, water-jets, lasers engravers powerful enough to work with metal,  multi-axis milling machines, and more — it goes far beyond simple awesome tooling to be, from what I gather, a collegiate atmosphere where everyone is extraordinarily motivated to learn, make,  and do things that push the limits of creativity, and in a context where the expected norm is to share and disseminate knowledge through the Instructables knowledge sharing website platform.  Buzz Aldrin (Astronaut of Apollo XI moon-landing fame and the second person to walk on the moon after Neil Armstrong) was hanging out there testing a functioning magnetic repulsion hoverboard a few weeks ago,  for instance.    To be included in the cohort of selected artists for 2015 is a huge honor and inspires me to the grandest ambitions.  Thank you,  universe.  Thank you,  Noah.  Thank you, Vanessa.  Thank you, Mary.  Thank you, Karen.

PIER 9 AiR PROGRAM from Pier 9 on Vimeo.

Computer Controlled Variable Aperture Soap Film Iris – First Bubbles!

I’m fascinated with ephemeral phenomena,  and the most recent manifestation of this has led me to invent some elaborate technical apparatus to make photographs of huge bubbles doing interesting things.  Here are two videos of it working for the first time- the first with a series of close-up views of different components, the second as a wide-view of the whole system in operation.

Giant bubbles are uniquely able to engage and delight people of all types.   Who can resist feeling wonder and awe at giant, floating, opalescent, undulating transparent orbs and the salience they give to normally invisible 3-dimensional flows?  After my first experience blowing bubbles from a moving bicycle (the wind past the bicycle removes any requirement to blow or move the wand, you just adjust your speed to get the right wind),   I was hooked.

I’ve organized a number of bubble blowing events,  especially the “Bubbles on Bikes Jamboree Ride” for Bike Pittsburgh’s Bikefest and the first ever “Giant Bubbles Flash Mob”.   For the latter, I manufactured 45 giant bubble wands,  and about 25 gallons of giant bubble juice,   and coordinated a synchronized release of ridiculously many   insanely huge giant bubbles.    Beyond the pre-arranged 45 bubble blowers,  we had the fully invested attention and participation of somewhere between 300 and 500 people for several solid hours.  All for about two days prep and maybe $200 in materials (including the pizza for the wand-making party).    See the nicely polished video made by Ben Saks of Float Pictures here,  or the great single-take cellphone video clip from Jason Kirin here.


For some things I’d like to do, I required a highly repeatable way of producing bubbles,  and controlling aspects like timing and size and speed and direction.  I also love a good engineering challenge,  and so I invented a cable iris aperture mechanism and set out to use it to make a uniquely flexible and useful bubble machine.  A CNC bubble machine.

There’s a few very sophisticated things I’d like to do with this which I’ll write about later, but for the first project I’m looking forward to making playful occupational portraits of some friends, mentors, and elders I feel lucky to know and learn from.  I’m fortunate to have a few such in my life,  in their sixties, seventies and eighties,  and who in addition to great technical accomplishments, embody wonderful spirits of playfulness and creativity in their golden years that it’d be my pleasure to honor and record with such portraits.

Computer Controlled Giant Bubble Blower Progress Update 11/14/04

Today I got the cables laced with a new, more robust-seeming cable than the cotton yarn I’d been using.   I also plumbed up  the fluid delivery needle valve and solenoid,  so it’s ready to go.

I let the system cycle open and closed a few thousand times while I worked,  once every second or two.

A hiccup occurred when the stepper motor was accidentally overdriven due to a mis-setting of the “run current” on the Vexta stepper driver.  This overheated the motor and caused a motor fault,  most likely a shorted coil.  Thankfully I’ve got a bin of stepper motors from various past projects and all that’s required to fix it is to 3D print a new adapter cog,  which links the new motors 0.233″ diameter shaft,  to the existing bicycle sprocket gear.  The old adapter was a 0.25″ diameter shaft.  Thankfully, modifying the CAD file, exporting a new STL model,  and 3-D printing a new pulley adapter requires only about 15 minutes of my time (with the print then occurring in the background for maybe 30 minutes).    Wiring in the new motor (identifying the color code of the stepper’s wires and soldering it to the cable connector) will take perhaps 45 minutes.

“The Human Scale” to show at 3RFF, Panel Discussion to Follow with Notables of City Bike-Ped Initiatives

The Human Scale is a gorgeous film about the ways in which the organization of our infrastructure shapes our lives.  Much of the last 50 years has seen cities organized around cars, with tragic consequences for common spaces and face-to-face human interaction.    The human scale documents some of the best efforts at bringing cities back to life as places for human, not automotive, interaction.

I am honored to get to introduce the film and, following the showing,  moderate a panel discussion with notable figures from the mayor’s office of community development,  the mayor’s office Bicycle/Pedestrian Coordinator,  and Bike Pittsburgh.

The Human Scale shows at the Harris Theater downtown,  809 Liberty Avenue,  on Thursday November 13th at 7:00 pm.  Panel Discussion to follow.   Tickets are $9, and can be bought online or in person.

Where will you say you were when, at 10:40 EST, humanity first landed a probe gently onto the surface of a comet in deep space?

Can you fathom what it must feel like to be one of the astronomers who, 45 years ago, discovered a comet, and is here today watching as we as a species are rendezvousing with that comet, gently landing a 200 pound Philae probe onto the surface, while we watch from the orbiting Rosetta spacecraft 19 miles above?

This is so humbling and inspiring to witness. Congratulations to everyone involved, especially the engineers which, by the various slingshot maneuvers, accelerated this spacecraft so deep into space on such a perfectly accurate trajectory to hit a bullseye hundreds of millions of miles away!!

Watch this amazing animation of the incredible 12 year long, half-a-billion-mile, bullseye we will see stick it’s landing here in less than one hour!!

May your life be as smooth as Silicon-Bronze TIG brazing.

small heptagon with square tubing at 45 degrees from flat, after welding and wire brushing.
An experiment in jig construction, TIG-brazing, and symmetry. This took about an hour from conception to completion, much of which was locating the V-blocks for clamping the tubing at 45 degrees during cutting.
Small heptagon with square tubing at 45 degrees from flat, as tacked together, showing fit-up.
Tacked at ID and OD. The fit of the bevel cuts is sublime! not a sheet of paper could be inserted at ID or OD of any joint. Spot on 64.3 degree (=90-(180/7)) bevel!

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Next step:  make four of these with the tubing’s face to table’s face angles sampling intervals of 0, 22.5, 45, and 67.5 degrees (or generally, angle increments of ([0:(n-1)]/n) * (360/(number_of_tubing_facets_equals_4_if_square_tubing)) degrees rotation from flat.   Make a jig to photograph them at consistent position,  then make looping stop motion animation of toroidal ring rotating around it’s minor axis…

Then,  perhaps, I will also incrementally crush each ring as I’ve done to destructively test prior similar experiments,  and register each frame,  so the animation might suggest continuation of the rotation throughout the increasing deformation.

Animated Retroreflective Safety Signage

I’ve been playing with a new process in which I remove the silvering of mirrors in detailed patterns,  leaving optically clear glass.

A zone plate made of mirror and optically clear glass zones will focus images in both reflectance and transmission.  The focal length of this plate, at visible wavelengths, is too long to be practical though.  I'm experimenting with shorter focal length, finer ring spacing, zone plates.
A zone plate made of mirror and optically clear glass zones will focus images in both reflectance and transmission. The focal length of this plate, at visible wavelengths, is too long to be practical though. I’m experimenting with shorter focal length, finer ring spacing, zone plates.

My first experiment was to make a Zone Plate,  but my current process didn’t have enough resolution to make fine enough lines for a zone plate of short focal length at normal visible wavelengths around 600nm:

However, the process is fantastic for barrier grid a.k.a. moiré a.k.a. ‘strip’ animations,  and for an afternoon project this has borne incredible fruit:  only about a dozen promising directions to go from here!  I decided to focus first on making an animated cautionary text and moving image safety sign for vehicles, especially bicycles,  especially helpful for night-time visibility.

 

Holy Moly, my friend and mentor was just awarded the Nation’s Highest Honor for Technology and Innovation!

Mary_Shaw_Receives_National_Medal_Of_Technology_And_Innovation
Mary Shaw is presented with the National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Barack Obama at the White House.
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Photo courtesy of Mary Shaw

The National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI) is the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement, bestowed by the president of the United States on America’s leading innovators. The recipients for this year were announced by President Obama on friday, and my most esteemed friend and mentor Mary Shaw is one of them!

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Mary Shaw is a gem.  She is a fantastically interesting, diversely competent, engaging, and modest person who I befriended and formed an immense respect for while completely ignorant  of her great eminence as Carnegie Mellon University’s Alan J Perlis University Professor of Computer Science (where she has taught since six years before I was born).  As we met she was to me simply an engaging, creative, person who’d engage in conversations over a workbench,  ‘soldering iron in hand’,  on subjects spanning LED lighting,  investment casting of custom metal drawer-pulls,  glider piloting,  glider construction, hot air balloon piloting,  critical path analysis, vortex rings, bicycling, bicycle touring, bubble blowing mechanisms,  bubble blowing while bicycle riding,  tensegrity sculpture design, math, physics, engineering, relationships, photography… everything.

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Mary introduces my puppy, Watz, to riding a bicycle.

When I proposed organizing a group bicycle ride for Bike-Fest here in Pittsburgh, for which riders would be equipped with bubble blowing equipment to produce large numbers of bubbles in the air we moved through, she and her husband Roy enthusiastically participated on a tandem.   They made the cover of the local paper,  riding that tandem and blowing bubbles, during the Pedal Pittsburgh Ride.

Mary and her husband Roy,  who I will occasionally assist as part of his Hot Air Balloon chase-van and recovery team (Mary is a pilot too,  of rigid winged gliders), are a marvelous couple.  They give a great model of what I imagine a happy seventh decade might best look like. They are frequently seen about Pittsburgh riding their tandem bicycle,  or working together at Techshop.  They ride the 330 mile Great Allegheny Passage bike path 330 miles between Pittsburgh and Washington DC every year,  revising their trail guide and publishing trip reports which have proven very helpful to other riders.  Their guide book is available for minimal cost, and their earlier trip reports can be found online.

Copyright Gordon Kirkwood 2014
Sometimes I organize giant bubble blowing flash mobs. It should not be surprising that immensely creative, intelligent, and eminent folks like Mary Shaw and Roy Weil, or Lowry Burgess, embrace these sorts of whimsy. This one was attended by about 400 people. An excellent video was produced by Ben Saks at http://vimeo.com/68497111

I found out about this award today after just talking with her Monday – she did me the huge honor of recommending me to the Autodesk Pier 9 Artist Residency,  which l have applied for –  and didn’t even bring it up.  Not that I’m one she’d brag to, but I think it’s representative of a quality I admire very much,  of understated but immense competence.

 

Mary Shaw,  Gordon Kirkwood, and Pittsburgh's new mayor Bill Peduto outside of Whimsy Engineering's office at Techshop Pittsburgh,  after President Obama's address there on the subject of innovation and entrepreneurship in America.
Mary Shaw, Gordon Kirkwood, and Pittsburgh’s new mayor Bill Peduto outside of Whimsy Engineering’s office at Techshop Pittsburgh, after President Obama’s address there on the subject of innovation and entrepreneurship in America.

 

Links:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/10/03/president-obama-honors-nation-s-top-scientists-and-innovators

CMU’s Shaw honored with National Medal of Technology and Innovation

Carnegie Mellon’s Mary Shaw Will Receive National Medal of Technology and Innovation

Obama taps computer pioneer Mary Shaw for National Medal of Technology and Innovation

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Shaw_(computer_scientist)